Meleagris gallopavo osceola {POPULATION: 115,000*}

He's the Sultan of the Swamp. Long-spurred and aggressive, he's not afraid to drop those jet black primary feathers into full strut to show off for the ladies across the orange grove or cattle pasture. Inhabiting only the Florida Peninsula, he's at home among heat, humidity, raptors and reptiles that most hunters would prefer to avoid. Yet the allure of hunting such a wild place and the desire to add him to their Grand Slam keeps die-hard hunters coming back year after year to pursue the legendary Meleagris gallopavo osceola. This is the Osceola Wild Turkey.

Osecolas are found only in the orange groves, cattle pastures and deep cypress swamps of the Florida peninsula.

Osecolas are found only in the orange groves, cattle pastures and deep cypress swamps of the Florida peninsula.

PHYSICAL MARKINGS

Osceolas exhibit dark chocolate-brown tips on the tailfeathers with chestnut brown tips on the smaller covert feathers.Osceolas exhibit dark chocolate-brown tips on the tailfeathers with chestnut brown tips on the smaller covert feathers.

Tailfan: Dark chocolate-brown tips on the tailfeathers; chestnut brown coverts

Wing Feathers: Very dark, consisting of large black bars and thin, broken white strips

Breast Feathers: Tipped in black and reflecting iridescent greens and reds, with less bronze than Easterns

Spurs: Often long, thin and razor-sharp due to the softer terrain they inhabit in the swamps of Florida

Beard: Generally thinner and slightly shorter than those of Easterns

Gobble: 4 out of 5 in strength compared to the other Grand Slam subspecies

{ SIZE   16-20   lbs. }   The smallest of all subspecies, the Osceola's smaller body size often makes them appear to have longer legs.

{SIZE 16-20 lbs.}

The smallest of all subspecies, the Osceola's smaller body size often makes them appear to have longer legs.

HABITAT

Osceolas thrive in the vast orange groves, open pastures and deep cypress swamps of the Sunshine State. You'll have to endure mosquitoes and watch your step to avoid cottonmouths, rattle snakes and alligators, but Osceola hunting is an experience unlike any other.

HUNTING

Mornings begin with owl hoots echoing through the pines, followed by the sound of a gobbler roosted deep in the swamp over water. After fly-down, he'll head to dry land and openings to commence his daily routine. Decoys can be very effective, as prime habitat is limited and Osceolas are used to competing for it. By mid-morning, it’s usually hot enough to find strutting gobblers in the shade.

Osceola-Wild-Turkey-Subspecies-Flogging-Decoy-Sketch-Copyright-Ryan-Kirby.jpg
Named after Osceola, an early 19th century chief of the Seminole Indians, the Osceola subspecies inhabits only the Florida Peninsula.

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